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3 Questions Wedding Guests May Ask and How to Respond


As if planning your wedding isn’t hectic enough, answering the same questions over and over is certainly the last thing you want to deal with.  But chances are, you’re going to have a handful of guests checking in with you. Do your best to avoid every guest calling and texting you by providing this info clearly for them. Keep reading for some of the most common questions guests ask and how to handle them!



What should I wear?

     Your wedding invitations are the best place to make the desired attire very clear, so we highly recommend getting familiar with wedding attire wording for your invites. Here are a several commonly used:

  • Black tie (tuxedos and formal gowns)
  • Formal, black tie optional (suit and tie and dresses)
  • Semi-formal (suit and tie and cocktail dresses)
  • Cocktail attire (suits and party dresses)
  • Casual (button down polos and summer sundresses or a skirt or pants with a nice blouse)

Can I bring my new boyfriend/girlfriend? 

     You may have already trimmed down your guests list and may have even eliminated distant family members, but now your bestfriend is in a new relationship and wants him to tag along. You may have never met your friend’s new other half! This may be tricky for some because you don’t have the space on the guest list, but you also don’t want to upset your friend. Sharing on your wedding website is a great place to make it known in advance whether “plus-ones” are welcome. If you’d rather not have complete strangers witness your I dos, make sure it is clearly known.

Can I bring my kids?

     This is a biggie! For some engaged couples this poses quite the challenge. They want to have a flower girl(s) and/or ring bearer(s) for their ceremony, but also want a kid-free wedding. This dilemma is completely understandable. Couples, listen – It. Is. Your. Wedding! What do you want? If you prefer to have children in your ceremony, but not your reception see if you can arrange for them to be picked up. Either way, be prepared for some guests to ask you this question.

     Although part of you may want to just state “no kids” on your invite that might not be the harsh vibe you want your guests to probably receive. How you address your invitation may be a subtle, but helpful way to get the point across. By addressing the envelope to the adults only, and not “The Johnson Family”, may help limit some questions. Ultimately, sharing on your wedding website may be the best place to write an upbeat phrase that clearly states adult-only. Here are two examples:

We look forward to celebrating with you! Kick your shoes off and enjoy a relaxing kid-free evening with us.

Ceremony Only: “Children are welcome to the ceremony, however to allow all of our guests to enjoy an evening of relaxation, we politely request adult attendance only.

 


 

 

 

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